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Washington v. State

Court of Criminal Appeals of Tennessee, Nashville

February 27, 2015

KEESHA WASHINGTON
v.
STATE OF TENNESSEE

October 29, 2014 Session

Appeal from the Circuit Court for Williamson County No. CR047261 Timothy L. Easter, Judge

Stacey Schlitz, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Keesha Washington.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Senior Counsel; Kim R. Helper, District Attorney General; and Mary Katharine White, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Robert H. Montgomery, Jr., J., delivered the opinion of the court, in which John Everett Williams and Roger A. Page, JJ., joined.

OPINION

ROBERT H. MONTGOMERY, JR., JUDGE

This case arises from the Petitioner's conviction for setting fire to her apartment on May 30, 2006. She appealed, and this court summarized the facts of the case as follows:

At the trial, John Winborn testified that on May 30, 2006, he lived at Southwinds Apartments in Franklin, Tennessee. When he left for work that morning, he saw smoke coming from a nearby apartment and called 9-1-1. He saw five or six people leave the building but did not see the Defendant.
Brian Young testified that he lived at Southwinds Apartments in May 2006. As he prepared to leave for work on May 30, 2006, he saw smoke entering his apartment from beneath his bathroom cabinets. He and his girlfriend left the apartment through the back door because the front door was surrounded by a thick cloud of smoke. He said his bathroom and his kitchen shared a wall with the Defendant's apartment. He saw four or five other people leave the building that morning. He was not able to live in his apartment for one week while it was repaired.
Franklin Fire Captain Chris Brown testified that on May 30, 2006, he responded to a fire at the Defendant's apartment and saw large amounts of smoke coming from the apartment. He said that the apartment's front door was locked and that they had to kick down the door to enter the apartment. The firemen extinguished a burning pile of cloth or paper near a sofa before realizing that a second fire was burning in the hallway. He said that the "primary seed of the fire" was in a utility closet and that they put out the fire. Two additional fires, one near a television and another near a computer, had already extinguished themselves. He found a match in the center of the fire that burned near the television. He said that the fires had four separate points of origin and that he secured the scene while he waited for fire marshal investigators to arrive. On cross-examination, Captain Brown agreed that lighter fluid was combustible and that a rag soaked in lighter fluid could catch on fire if it were near a substantial source of heat or near a flame. He agreed the fire in the utility closet caused significant damage to the closet door.
Abby Wittenmeier testified that she managed Southwinds Apartments, where the Defendant leased an apartment. She responded to the scene after a resident called her. She said the building had sixteen apartments and was evacuated. She identified the Defendant's lease, which required the Defendant to maintain a smoke detector in her apartment and prohibited her from damaging the apartment.
On cross-examination, Ms. Wittenmeier agreed that she kept the maintenance records for the apartments. The records showed that on February 18, 2006, the Defendant notified them that her heat was not working and that her front door would not lock. The records also reflected that maintenance personnel replaced loose wall outlets in the Defendant's apartment and that the Defendant made sixteen maintenance requests in the sixteen-week period between her moving in and the fire. She agreed that the last request was on May 22 and that it involved a malfunctioning air conditioner.
Whitney Mitchell testified that she previously worked for State Farm Insurance and that she handled the Defendant's renter's insurance policy. She said that the Defendant's initial policy limit was $25, 000 but that on May 22, 2006, the Defendant requested that her coverage be increased to $50, 000. She said that the Defendant repeatedly asked when the increased coverage would go into effect and that she made a note of the Defendant's question. On May 30, the Defendant called Ms. Mitchell and said that she had air conditioning problems and that her apartment complex called her while she was running errands and told her a fire occurred in her apartment. The Defendant filed an insurance claim on May 30 to recover money for the fire damage.
On cross-examination, Ms. Mitchell acknowledged that she sold insurance for State Farm and that she was not a claims representative. She denied persuading customers to increase their insurance coverage. She did not remember the Defendant's complaints about not receiving copies of her automobile, life, and renter's insurance policies after the Defendant transferred her policies from Michigan to Tennessee.
Franklin Fire Lieutenant Geoff Woodlard, an expert in fire investigation and fire origin and cause, testified that he investigated the cause of the fires at the Defendant's apartment and found separate points of origin. He said that the fires were not caused by electrical or mechanical malfunctions and that they each had separate causes. He observed a container of lighter fluid in a storage area on the Defendant's patio and a match on a burnt towel in the living room. The towel was processed and tested positive for ignitable fluid. He said the smoke alarm was not attached to its proper place outside the master bedroom but was found on the floor of a second bedroom. He said the smoke alarm was functional and contained a battery. A book of matches was found on the kitchen counter. He said that in his opinion, the fires were set intentionally.
On cross-examination, Lieutenant Woodlard agreed that he consulted with Franklin Fire Marshal Andy King in concluding that the fires were set intentionally. He acknowledged that he was not able to rule out an accidental cause for the fire that burned a cardboard box in the living room. He said he was able to rule out mechanical or electrical causes for that fire, which left accidental or intentional causes. He could not rule out intentional or accidental causes for the fire in the living room that burned the sofa. He agreed a grill and charcoal were found on the patio near the storage closet where he saw lighter fluid. He agreed that the smoke detector was not covered with soot and that it did not melt.
On redirect examination, Lieutenant Woodlard testified that the smoke detector was not exposed to the same heat as other items in the apartment because it was separated from the fires and located around a corner. He said it was not likely that the heat from the fire in the closet was hot enough to cause the towel in the living room to ignite because the temperature at floor-level would have been 300 to 400 degrees. He said a room would need to be 500 to 800 degrees to ignite a towel without a flame. On recross-examination, Lieutenant Woodlard acknowledged that lighter fluid could ignite at 230 degrees.
Courtney Rowe testified that in May 2006, she lived at Southwinds Apartments with her mother. On the morning of May 30, 2006, she smelled something burning and heard a fire alarm and people banging on her door. She left the building while the fire department put out the fire. She said that her laundry room shared a wall with the Defendant's apartment and that her dryer was stained black from the smoke. On cross-examination, Ms. Rowe testified that she did not see smoke in her apartment but that she saw soot in her laundry room.
Christopher Baker, an expert in fire origin and cause, testified that he investigated fires for the insurance industry and that he investigated the fires at the Defendant's apartment. He was assisted by David Wright, an electrical engineer who performed fire investigations. Mr. Baker interviewed the Defendant and was told that she left her apartment on the morning of the fire, that she did not cook or use her dryer before leaving, and that she left a tea candle burning in her bedroom when she left. She also told him that she removed her smoke detector from the ceiling to test it because she had been having problems with her HV/AC system and was afraid that the system could start a fire. He said smoke detectors could be tested without removing them. He said the Defendant told him that there were not any flammable fluids in her home.
Mr. Baker testified that he spoke with the Defendant but not the fire department before he examined the Defendant's apartment. He said there were "separated and unconnected origins of fire, " with three separate fires in the living room and a fourth in the hallway closet. He said that the main fire occurred in the hallway closet and that he did not find an electrical failure or activity that would have caused the fire. He said the fires in the living room were not started by radiant heat from the closet fire or by an electrical malfunction. He said that samples taken from the apartment tested positive for flammable liquids and that he found burn patterns indicating that flammable fluid was poured onto the floor. He found a tea candle in the bedroom but did not find anything burned in the bedroom. He concluded that the fires in the Defendant's apartment were intentionally set.
On cross-examination, Mr. Baker testified that the interior walls of the apartment had not been "compromised by fire." He agreed flammable fluid was not found on two of the samples he sent for testing. He said he consulted with Fire Marshal King after inspecting the Defendant's apartment and learned that the fire department removed a match from the apartment. He agreed he reviewed maintenance records from the Defendant's apartment showing that she had problems with the furnace and with "plugs" falling out. He did not examine the materials collected by the fire department. He said that his investigation was independent and that his findings were separate from those made by the fire department. He agreed lighter fluid was found in an outdoor storage area but said he did not test the fluid to see if it matched the flammable liquid found on the samples he took from the apartment.
David Wright, an expert in mechanical and electrical engineering, testified that he performed engineering and fire investigations. He said that he helped Mr. Baker investigate the fire at the Defendant's apartment and that his primary role was to examine the mechanical and electrical aspects of the apartment. He said he determined the ignition sources near each fire location and examined whether they could have started the fires. He said that within the closet where the main fire occurred, he examined the light fixture, the water heater and its wiring, and the HV/AC unit and determined that they did not cause the fire. He said that a loose and disconnected wire in one of the heating elements of the HV/AC unit would not cause a fire and that he found nothing to suggest that the fire began in the HV/AC unit. He said he examined the circuit breaker and found that three breakers were tripped as a result of flames in the closet burning the wiring in the HV/AC unit and the water heater. He said he reviewed the maintenance records for the apartment and ultimately determined that the fires were not caused by a mechanical or an electrical failure.
Doctor Thomas Alvin Eaton, an expert in engineering, testified that he was an engineer and fire investigator and that he specialized in evaluating electrical and mechanical problems that could cause a fire. He conducted an independent investigation of the fires at the Defendant's apartment and examined the building's electrical system and all of the appliances in the Defendant's apartment. He found nothing that would cause an electrical or mechanical fire. He said that a malfunction in the HV/AC unit caused a wire to melt, but that the malfunction did not cause the fire. He said that nothing was near the wire that would have burned and that there was no evidence that a fire began in the HV/AC unit. He also found an electrical short circuit in the HV/AC unit, but he attributed it to the wire's insulation being burned off during the fire, which allowed the wire to short circuit. He said the short circuit did not start the fire.
Michael Rambo, an expert in fire investigations, testified that he worked for Southern Fire Analysis in 2005 and that he supervised fire investigations. He was hired by State Farm to conduct an independent investigation of the fire at the Defendant's apartment. He said that a large fire occurred in the hallway closet and that he hired Dr. Eaton to examine the mechanical equipment in the closet. Mr. Rambo said he found nothing to indicate that the water heater or HV/AC unit caused the fire. He said that the fire appeared to have originated on the floor of the closet on the right side and that he thought it was caused by an external ignition source. He said that three small fires occurred in the living room and that nothing indicated that the apartment wiring or appliance wiring caused the fires. He said that the fires in the living room were caused by "a separate ignition introduced by someone . . . ." He said that he took samples from the hallway, the closet, and in front of the couch in the living room, that he sent the samples to AK Analytical Services for testing, and that the samples taken from the closet and from near the couch tested positive for a "mineral spirits-type distillate." He concluded the five separate fires were not connected.
On cross-examination, Mr. Rambo agreed that he inspected the apartment on June 2, 2006, and that Dr. Eaton inspected the apartment on June 5. He agreed that he knew the Defendant had been arrested for arson when he wrote his report on July 5. He also agreed a fire could exist behind a wall and be hidden from view. On redirect examination, Mr. Rambo testified that nothing indicated that an unseen fire burned within the walls of the Defendant's apartment.
Dennis Akin, an expert in forensic investigations, testified that he was a forensic scientist who specialized in examining fire debris and fire-related substances. He said that he owned and operated AK Analytical Services and that he examined samples taken from the Defendant's apartment. He said the samples taken from the closet and from near the couch tested positive for a "deodorized mineral spirits-type product, " an ignitable liquid most commonly associated with charcoal lighters. He said four of the seven samples submitted to him tested positive for ignitable liquid.
Bobby Medlen testified that he worked as a claims representative for State Farm Insurance. He said that the Defendant had a renter's insurance policy with State Farm and that she increased her policy limits for personal property from $25, 000 to $50, 000 on May 22, 2006. The Defendant submitted an insurance claim after the fire but later withdrew the claim on July 17, 2006.
On cross-examination, Mr. Medlen agreed that the Defendant transferred her car insurance policy from Michigan to Tennessee on March 22, 2006, and then cancelled the policy on April 28, 2006. He did not know if she cancelled her policy due to cost increases.
Kevin Adams testified that he was formerly a detective with the Franklin Police Department and that he led the police investigation of the fires at the Defendant's apartment, in conjunction with the Franklin Fire Department. Samples were taken from the Defendant's apartment and sent to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) for testing. He said that he interviewed the Defendant twice and that she waived her Miranda rights and agreed to speak with him. During their first interview, the Defendant denied seeing a fire and told him that she did not have any involvement with the fires, that she did not know how they started, and that she heard "popping" noises coming from her furnace before she left her apartment that morning.
Mr. Adams testified that during the second interview, the Defendant told him that after she heard a popping noise in the furnace, she went into the closet and saw smoke or fire. She told him that she removed a cardboard box from the closet, shut the closet door, and put her children in the car. She also told him that she returned to the apartment to smoke a cigarette, threw the match used to light the cigarette on a towel, threw her cigarette somewhere in the apartment, and left the apartment because she was "so mad and upset that the apartment was on fire . . . ." He said the Defendant stated that she removed the smoke alarm because it was beeping. The Defendant did not tell him that she tried to put out the fires.
On cross-examination, Mr. Adams acknowledged that several firefighters were in the Defendant's apartment when he arrived on May 30, 2006. He did not know if the fire personnel moved anything within the apartment before he arrived. He said that the Defendant did not tell him if she took medication on the day of the fire but that he would have made a note on his report if she appeared to be under the influence of anything. He agreed he had been around people who were unaware of what they were saying after taking medication. He agreed that Fire Marshal King was present during the second interview with the Defendant and that Marshal King asked most of the questions. He did not know if he asked the Defendant if she had taken any medications before they spoke and said he could not tell that the Defendant was under the influence of medication during the trial by looking at her. He did not know if he or Marshal King told the Defendant that the police found her fingerprints on a pack of matches taken from her apartment. He said he may have told the Defendant it was possible that the police would find her fingerprints on the matches. He did not know if fingerprints were found on the matches.
On redirect examination, Mr. Adams identified the TBI latent fingerprint report and agreed that no fingerprints were found on the matchbook. He agreed the Defendant was told she could leave the interviews at any time.
Franklin Fire Marshal Andy King testified that he led the investigation of the fires at the Defendant's apartment. He went to the apartment and spoke with the Defendant, who told him that she heard the furnace make a popping noise that morning and that she was the last person to leave the apartment. The Defendant told him that she had no idea how the fires started and that her children did not play with fire. He met with the Defendant for a second interview after examining the evidence from her apartment and learning that the Defendant increased her renter's insurance coverage before the fire. He said he told the Defendant at the start of the second interview, "we called you in, and it's because you set the fire." He said the Defendant initially denied starting the fires but ultimately admitted that she knew of the fire in the closet before she left the apartment and that she threw a match onto a towel in her living room and saw the towel turn black. The Defendant told him that she moved a cardboard box from the closet and that she left the apartment after becoming upset. He said the Defendant did not say that she called 9-1-1 or tried to put out the fires. He said the Defendant did not state in her first interview that she removed the smoke detector. In the second interview, she told him that she removed the smoke detector and placed it in the master bedroom.
On cross-examination, Marshal King agreed that the second interview with the Defendant was on June 7, 2006, and that he had enough evidence before conducting the second interview to convince him that the Defendant caused the fires. He agreed he did not have reports from Dr. Eaton, Mr. Rambo, Mr. Akin, or Mr. Wright before the second interview, but he said he did not need the reports because multiple unexplained fires would have been set by a person. He agreed the multiple points of origin caused him to believe that the Defendant set the fires. He agreed he did not receive the TBI results until months after the second interview. He said that the Defendant voluntarily came to the interview and that she was not under arrest. He did not know if the Defendant took any medication before the interview and did not ask her if she used medication. He agreed the Defendant's child watched television with a detective in a separate room while he spoke with the Defendant. He agreed that the Defendant asked to leave the room to see her child and that he told the Defendant he could not speak with her after that day.
On redirect examination, Marshal King testified that the independent investigations of the fires had no bearing on his investigation because the multiple independent fires were evidence that the fires were set by a person. He said he never told the Defendant that she could not leave the interview room. He said that during his investigation, he ruled out everyone except the Defendant as the cause of the fires, including her children and husband.
On recross-examination, Marshal King agreed that he asked the Defendant and her husband if their children played with fire. He said the Defendant's nine-year-old daughter came to him at the scene of the fires and told him that she heard a "pop" in the furnace. On further redirect examination, Marshal King testified that each time he spoke with the Defendant, she mentioned hearing a pop in the furnace.
Randall Nelson, an expert in microanalysis, testified that he was a forensic scientist and that he worked in the microanalysis unit of the TBI laboratory in Nashville. He examined evidence removed from the Defendant's home by the Franklin Police Department, including a towel found in the living room and two samples of carpet removed from the hallway. He said that the carpet did not contain ignitable liquid but that the towel tested positive for "dearomatized medium petroleum distillate, " a component of camping fuels, charcoal starters, and paint thinner. He said it was not possible to compare a match removed from the apartment to a matchbook removed from the apartment because the match was burned.
The Defendant's thirteen-year-old daughter testified for the defense that she spoke with counselors about things that bothered her, including stress from seeing her parents fighting and her enjoyment of smelling gasoline. She said that her parents told her not to smell gasoline or lighter fluid but that she would smell it when they were not present. She said she was nine years old when she lived at Southwinds Apartments with her father, sister, and the Defendant. She said that she smelled the lighter fluid her father used for the grill and that both she and her sister smelled and played with the lighter fluid in the living room and spilled it there. She said she played with fire at her grandmother's home and lit paper towels on fire. She said that on May 30, 2006, she went into the kitchen and saw a lighter and a roll of paper towels on the counter. She said she lit a paper towel on fire and threw it in a closet when she heard the Defendant walking toward the kitchen.
On cross-examination, she testified that her parents were going through a divorce and that their fighting was stressful. She said that the only place she spilled lighter fluid in the living room was near the television and that she used a towel from the closet to clean the spill. She said she kicked over the lighter fluid container and spilled it on the towel as she attempted to clean up the first spill. She said she left the towel on the floor, put the lighter fluid on the patio, and told her mom about the spill. She agreed she spoke with Fire Marshal King and the prosecutor. She agreed she previously said that she spilled water on an electrical outlet near the computer desk and that she saw the outlet spark and turn black. She agreed she mentioned the outlet after hearing her father and the Defendant argue about the fires at the apartment.
Doctor Venecia Tippett testified that the Defendant was her niece. She said that after her son's funeral on December 4, 2000, she saw the Defendant's daughter playing with matches in the bathroom of a neighborhood club house. She said that in January 2001, the daughter came into her bedroom and set a blouse on fire. On cross-examination, Dr. Tippett testified that she did not know that the daughter attended counseling sessions or told her counselor about only one incident of setting a paper towel on fire.
The Defendant testified that she moved to Tennessee in February 2006 and that there were delays when she attempted to transfer her State Farm insurance policies from Michigan to Tennessee. She said that her car insurance premium increased by $1000 per month and that she cancelled the policy with State Farm on April 28, 2006. She said that the State Farm agent attempted to persuade her to purchase a different type of life insurance and that she was not happy with their customer service because she did not receive her "paperwork." She said she did not ask to increase her renter's insurance coverage on May 22, 2006. She said that she called State Farm that day to request a copy of her policy and ...

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