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United States v. Real Property Located at 1308 Selby Lane, Knoxville, Tennessee

United States District Court, E.D. Tennessee, Knoxville

April 16, 2015

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Plaintiff,
v.
REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1308 SELBY LANE, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE, 37922, Defendant.

MEMORANDUM OPINION

LEON JORDAN, District Judge.

This civil forfeiture action in rem is before the court on the United States' "Motion to Determine Validity and Extent of Lien" [doc. 23] and "Knox County's Motion for Relief from Judgment and to Determine the Validity and Extent of Knox County's Tax Lien" [doc. 25]. The motions have been fully briefed and are ripe for the court's determination. For the reasons that follow, the United States' motion will be granted and Knox County's motion will be denied.

I.

Background

On October 5, 2010, Leslie Janous was indicted in this court on 13 counts of wire fraud. The indictment contained a forfeiture allegation as to real property located at 1308 Selby Lane in Knoxville, Tennessee. Janous subsequently pled guilty and was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of 110 months. On November 4, 2011, the court entered an agreed preliminary order of forfeiture in the criminal case. [3:10-CR-124, doc. 56]. Therein, Janous agreed in material part to forfeit her interest in the Selby Lane property and what appears to be an adjacent "tract two" located at 1525 Wembley Hill Road (collectively, "the real property").

On October 1, 2010, the United States filed the instant civil action, a verified complaint in rem against the two tracts of the Selby Lane property. On September 27, 2012, the court entered an "Agreed Consent Order and Entry of Forfeiture for Property Located at 1308 Selby Lane, Knoxville, Tennessee and 1525 Wembley Hill Road, Knoxville, Tennessee" ("final order of forfeiture") which addressed the rights of claimants Regions Bank, The Painted Room, and Scancarbon. [Doc. 19].

The final order of forfeiture states that "the United States sent Notice of Complaint for Forfeiture directly to all individuals and entities known by the Government to have interest in the Defendant Property." [Doc. 19, p. 2]. That was, however, not the case. Admittedly,

Pursuant to the pattern of practice in this district, the United States did not directly notice Knox County; instead it recognized the valid [property tax] lien without requiring Knox County to file a claim in the judicial proceeding. The United States seldom sends direct notice to the local and state governments regarding its real property forfeiture; rather the United States recognizes those liens in full and pays the accrued taxes and interest of those liens in full from the sale proceeds.

[Doc. 24, p. 2-3].

The United States sold the real property in late 2014 but a disagreement arose between the United States and Knox County as to the extent of the latter's tax lien. Those parties entered into an "Agreed Order Holding Proceeds of Sale in Escrow" which allowed the sale to go forward with a portion of the proceeds to be held until this court determined "the validity and extent of Knox County's lien." [Doc. 22; doc. 21, p. 1].

The United States filed its "Motion to Determine Validity and Extent of Lien" on November 14, 2014. It is the United States' position that Knox County has a valid lien for taxes and interest only up to the date of entry of the final order of forfeiture, September 27, 2012, because on that date the real property transferred to the United States and was thus exempt from state taxation. See, e.g., M'Culloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. 316 (1819). Acknowledging that it did not provide direct notice to Knox County, the United States argues that it provided "constructive and actual" notice by internet publication and by the October 5, 2010 filing of a notice of lis pendens with the Knox County Register of Deeds. The United States also contends that it was entitled to rely on its above-cited "pattern of practice." Lastly, the United States argues that Knox County cannot show that it was prejudiced by any lack of notice.

"Knox County's Motion for Relief from Judgment and to Determine the Validity and Extent of Knox County's Tax Lien" was filed on December 12, 2014. Knox County seeks relief under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 60(b)(4), stressing that its motion is not brought under any other provision of Rule 60. [Doc. 25, p. 1; doc. 27, p. 10]. Knox County argues that it was given insufficient notice of the forfeiture, thereby rendering the final order of forfeiture "void." Although the motion and briefing are not entirely clear, it is presumably Knox County's position that it is due taxes and interest up to the date of the real property's sale. Knox County seeks an order "declaring all prior proceedings, orders, and judgments in the above captioned forfeiture action void and of no effect and reopening the action for further hearing to allow Knox County, as an innocent owner, to assert its interest in the Defendant Property." [Doc. 27, p.12].

II.

Analysis


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